Tutoring: A fresh debate

I’ve just finished an article on tuition, and am boldly looking for a publisher! I thought I’d share it here: Tutoring: a fresh debate. Private tuition has entered the national conversation. For long a rather mysterious operation, the media has woken up to its rapid growth – especially after the Sutton Trust showed that 43% …

Repetition

I’ve recently moved house, and for the first time have all my books in one place. This evening was one of the first chances I have had to actually make use of them. I re-read some dog-eared passages from Richard Sennett’s amazing, rambling book The Craftsman. I’m glad I re-discovered this passage – a defence …

Role of Teacher in 21st Century?

I quite like this from David Price’s blog today, about the role of the teacher in the future: Imparter of Knowledge, Guide and Personal Search Engine The last most of all, though. It seems to have gone pretty unnoticed that teachers are strictly not gatekeepers of knowledge these days – rather, they are the sifters, …

Jan Sramek and Racing Towards Excellence

We’ve been having some very interesting meetings with the team from Racing Towards Excellence. They seem to share some of our concerns about the provision for quality, impartial careers advice in schools today. For the purposes of this post, I wanted to quote a bit from Jan Sramek (the co-author’s) introduction to the book – …

The Traveling School

I came across a student of the Traveling School on holiday this summer. I had been initially struck by how much she enthused about her education, and was fascinated to hear about this project. In their own words: The Traveling School started in the Spring of 2000 with a revolutionary concept generated by a group …

Michael Gove and the return to ‘chalk-and-talk’

I would really urge watching Michael Gove at the RSA on ‘What education is for’. There’s quite some possibility that this talk will act as one of the first big salvos in what is shaping up to be an increasingly divisive debate between the parties on education ahead of the General Election. It has galvanised …

Video Games and Children: first salvo

I’m going to start fondly at home: with dysTalk. Last October, Tom Maher gave a talk for us on Video Games and Children. It was an elegant and convincing argument against their use from the perspective of a teacher, and shall form a perfect opening for our debate. His allegations: 1. They take up children’s …

Benjamin Franklin’s education

I’m re-reading John Taylor Gatto’s The Underground History of American Education, a rollicking read, and feel compelled to quote the passages on Benjamin Franklin’s education. Frustratingly, JTG is quite footnote-shy so I’m going to have to take his word for it. Indirectly, this provides early anecdotal evidence for the key role parents play in a …

A Fresh Start

With the optimism of the summer and a new academic year, this blog is going to see some changes. 4 posts a week, A bit more direction I’ve felt myself lurch ever closer to the ‘club bore’ on matters of education; this blog (rather than the ears of bored friends) shall become by receptacle instead. …

Matthew Parris vs. Clay Shirky

A great piece in Saturday’s Times from Matthew Parris on the speed and ease of communication – and its possible impact on liberty. Discussing the publication of the list of BNP members – and what bloggers have done with it: What has changed is not the principle of what may be done, but the effortlessness …